The History of the WTRH Crest

Part 1: By Emma Kesler

Denise Yates and I are both passionate about Welsh Terriers and the future of our beloved rare breed. From sourcing difficult-to-find photographs, to personally collecting oral histories of record holders, Denise has worked tirelessly. What she has accomplished is remarkable, and her dream of making this history accessible is truly a gift.

I was honored to be asked to develop this website and the art direction for WTRH. WTRH is more than just a website– it is a living, breathing archive. WTRH preserves a rich heritage and is ready for new history as it is made.

I immediately knew that I wanted the WTRH logo to be a crest. My sister told me that historically crests were highly visual because many viewers did not know how to read. Any text was often secondary, and more often than not was in the form of slogans. Therefore I suggested that the meaning be represented in the icons represented in the crest, and the text be slogans which could be descriptive words about the breed. Denise provided Welsh words in keeping with the heritage of the breed.

The crest began as a drawing in India ink, then a carving, then a block print. At that point, I needed to bring in another visual person’s eye, and a history expert. I reached out to my sister Marika Kesler, who has a background in cultural heritage studies and has a Masters in Museum Studies.

Left: The mess of the creative process. Designing the WTRH Crest.
Right: Record-Holder "Miles" wearily oversees the development of the WTRH crest. Courtesy E. Kesler.

Part 2: By Marika Kesler

Having studied medieval literature in my undergraduate degree, specifically that of the Arthurian legend, heraldry was an interest of mine and I enjoyed the opportunity of this project. Emma had already come up with beautiful foliage for the mantling, a trophy in place of the helm, and the terrier crest, which I thought would be complemented within the shield by the simplicity of the flag of Saint David, the patron saint of Wales. With a focus on ensuring the mantling would be accurate and unique both in monochrome and in full colour, I refined Emma’s design and we worked together to position the flag in the centre of the crest. Hand-lettering and calligraphy are a hobby of mine, and the final step was to model a font based on Welsh stone carvings for the motto.

Dignified, Intrepid, Indefatigable

Once I was finished with the hand-drawn lettering and revision of Emma’s original hand-drawn crest, Emma got to work digitalizing it. This is a lengthly process involving smoothing lines, and “vectorizing” the logo so that it can be easily scaled up for a wide variety of printing needs.

The WTRH crest was officially completed December of 2018, by Kesler sisters Marika and Emma.

The History of the WTRH Crest

Part 1: By Emma Kesler

Denise Yates and I are both passionate about Welsh Terriers and the future of our beloved rare breed. From sourcing difficult-to-find photographs, to personally collecting oral histories of record holders, Denise has worked tirelessly. What she has accomplished is remarkable, and her dream of making this history accessible is truly a gift.

I was honored to be asked to develop this website and the art direction for WTRH. WTRH is more than just a website– it is a living, breathing archive. WTRH preserves a rich heritage and is ready for new history as it is made.

I immediately knew that I wanted the WTRH logo to be a crest. My sister told me that historically crests were highly visual because many viewers did not know how to read. Any text was often secondary, and more often than not was in the form of slogans. Therefore I suggested that the meaning be represented in the icons represented in the crest, and the text be slogans which could be descriptive words about the breed. Denise provided Welsh words in keeping with the heritage of the breed.

The crest began as a drawing in India ink, then a carving, then a block print. At that point, I needed to bring in another visual person’s eye, and a history expert. I reached out to my sister Marika Kesler, who has a background in cultural heritage studies and has a Masters in Museum Studies.

Left: The mess of the creative process. Designing the WTRH Crest.
Right: Record-Holder "Miles" wearily oversees the development of the WTRH crest. Courtesy E. Kesler.

Part 2: By Marika Kesler

Having studied medieval literature in my undergraduate degree, specifically that of the Arthurian legend, heraldry was an interest of mine and I enjoyed the opportunity of this project. Emma had already come up with beautiful foliage for the mantling, a trophy in place of the helm, and the terrier crest, which I thought would be complemented within the shield by the simplicity of the flag of Saint David, the patron saint of Wales. With a focus on ensuring the mantling would be accurate and unique both in monochrome and in full colour, I refined Emma’s design and we worked together to position the flag in the centre of the crest. Hand-lettering and calligraphy are a hobby of mine, and the final step was to model a font based on Welsh stone carvings for the motto.

Dignified, Intrepid, Indefatigable

Once I was finished with the hand-drawn lettering and revision of Emma’s original hand-drawn crest, Emma got to work digitalizing it. This is a lengthly process involving smoothing lines, and “vectorizing” the logo so that it can be easily scaled up for a wide variety of printing needs.

The WTRH crest was officially completed December of 2018, by Kesler sisters Marika and Emma.